OMG – It’s May! – Time for some serious planting

Okay it is actually May! Not sure when that happened but that means the bulk of your garden clean-up should be done and time to focus on getting some flowers, herbs, and veggies into the ground if you haven’t done so already.

This is the time of the year to plant marigolds, calendula, California poppies, cosmos, nasturtiums (both flowers and leaves can be added to salads as well), sweet peas, yarrow (great for the bees), and wildflowers to add a little splash of colour to your garden in the next few months.  For tastier treats beans, carrots, beets, collards, storage onions, peas, and swiss chard to name just a few to get put into the ground.

I listened to a recent gardening podcast (A way to Garden with Margaret Roach) and she said something that really stuck with me and that was before planting something know what the end game will be.  What she meant was before you plant anything know what you’re going to use it for: ornamental, fresh consumption or for winter storage, or just to try something new.  By knowing the answer to this it will help your choose not only the right veggies, herbs, and flowers but the right varieties that you will get the most use out of.  There is nothing worse with having an abundance of garden goodies and no idea what to do with them or they are the wrong variety for storage and now you have too much for fresh consumption.  Many herbs can be easily frozen for use during the winter months (I did this with chives & parsley this past winter with great success, I also did with Sage but still haven’t figured out what to do with the abundance and even though I already gave one sage plant away this spring i still have three in the garden – let me know if there are any takers!).  Other great advice can be found at A Way to Garden – her podcasts offer a wealth of information and interesting factoids from a lot of different knowledgeable professional gardening or gardening related experts.

May is also the time to start hardening off your seedlings for transplant (if you haven’t started already).  I’m lucky in that I get a decent amount of sunlight on my balcony and it’s covered with glass inserts with narrow openings to limit the amount of wind.  This provides a transitionary environment for my seedlings so they get exposed to the outdoors after being in the climate controls of my grow light but still protected from the rain and some of the wind as they get adjusted to new temperatures. After they have been out on the balcony for 24hr periods for about a week sometimes more I move them into the garden so it less of a full shock to their system.  Here are some tips from Gardening Know How on hardening off your seedlings.  I have also seen many gardeners successfully use row covers and plastic mini-green houses till their seedlings are strong enough to handle the environmental ups and downs that are typical of garden life.

If you are an indoor seed starter this is also a great time to plant your squash and cucumber seeds inside for June transplanting.

Let’s remember the constant in an organic garden stay on-top of those weeds before they get too established and spread all over.  If you are part of a community garden like Cedar Grove this means that being neglicant on weeding can also have an effect on your plot neighbours ability to stay ahead of weeds in their plot. The dandelions between the plots also need to come up or at least be deadheaded when you see them in the common areas.

Advertisements

Community Earth Day Celebrations!

Spring has definitely arrived with green shoots and spring bulbs coming up all over the garden.  In the last week I’ve seen radishes, peas, lupins, tulips, daffodils, chives and much more adding a splash of colour to the landscape. Here is a bit of that to brighten your day.   

  

 

The first Earth Day was held back on April 22, 1970 so this April 22nd will be the 45th Earth day celebrations.  Learn more about why the Earth Day Network credits itslef with launching the modern environmental movement Earth Day 2015

There are so many events happening in the City of Surrey surrounding  this celebration that I decided to do an entire post just on this topic.

1. Spring Releaf Tree Planting hosted by the City of Surrey – Wednesday evenings in April at various parks throughout the city.  Since its inception in 1991 this program has through the help of volunteers planted oved 10, 000 trees throughout the cities parks and boulevards.   Releaf Tree Planting

2. Earth Day Nature Walk hosted by the City of Surrey – Saturday April 18 – 11am – Royal Kwantlen Park Earth Day Nature Walk

3. Surrey Clean Sweep hosted by the City of Surrey – Saturday April 18 – various locations – help with the beautification of our parks, neighbourhoods and streets. Surrey Clean Sweep

3. Party for the Planet hosted by the City of Surrey and various partners – Saturday April 25 – Civic Plaza – Events include light bulb recyclying, an urban market, bike powered smoothie shop, an evening concert and much more. Party for the Planet

4. Edible and Medicinal Plant Walk – Saturday April 18 – meet at Newton Recreation Centre – Learn about not only the benefits but how to identify various plants on this nature walk. Edible and Medicinal Plant Walk

A great book to learn more about the benefits of certain plants, the positive impact they have on your health, some new uses and to help you decide what herbes, edible flowers and veggies in your plot is a recent discovery of mine.  Power Plants by Frankie Flowers and Bryce Wylde. Here pictorial with tips for cooking with herbs once you decide what to grow.  Cooking with Herbs

Next Week: Spring Recipies Inspired by the Garden

Become BEE friendly

Save the bees has been a hot topic lately as more research has shown the continued use of various sprays and pesticides are wrecking havic on the bee population which we count on for a fair amount of our daily produce intake.  Learn more about this important issue at Save Honey Bees or view the documentary here Vanishing Bees

There is a lot you can do to help our bees by educating yourself to be an informed consumer and taking this knowlege into your own garden experiences. When purshasing seeds or plants from your local nursery dont be afraid to ask questions like were the seeds pre-treated and if so with what and were the plants treated with any types of chemicals that will cause harm to my gardens eco system balance. It can often be because of consumer demands and interests in this manner that will lead nurseries to offer more environmentally concious alternatives. The last time I asked a nursery if they had organic, non GMO plants I was told no. I grow most of my herbs, flowers, and veggies from organic, non-GMO seeds and would love to have this option to buy similar plants for slow growers such as rosemary. Just last week I saw an encoraging article that Art Knapp Plantland has told its suppliers it will no longer accept nursey plants treated with neonicontinoids Full Story. Learn more about what they are doing to save the bees Art Knapps Blog

Upcoming Honey events
include Honey, Hives and Poetry at the Vancouver Public Library. Public tours and basic bee keeping classes are available at Honeybee Centre and Hives for Humanity offers a number of workshops and bee services.

image

Create a bee friendly garden. This artcile from the David Suzuki Foundation gives some great pointers including one I wasn’t aware of which is to make sure your benficials have a place for a drink (water) close to the plants you need polinated Bee Friendly Garden. Of course planting flowers and herbs that attract all kinds of beneficials will not only make your garden look beautiful but also provide a food source.

Next Week: Upcoming Earth Day Celebrations